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From Vampire stories to Heaven

Updated: Oct 11, 2022


a sun like star in a starry violet and greenish sky

(Artwork from "waking time" website)


Since I've been maybe 11 or 12 years, I was fascinated by all kinds of “horror stories” or “scary stories” …. There are many of course, also some “good” ones that can actually teach us something.

The vampires are “infected” and their bodies will from then on be “preserved” as they were at time of infection. They don’t age and they don’t die unless they’re exposed to sunlight and cursed to need blood as food… (sometimes I think of mosquitos) ….


They’re “allergic” to garlic (which does have really wonderful healing and “maintaining” compounds!! https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/11-proven-health-benefits-of-garlic

if you should wish to grow your own garlic: https://happydiyhome.com/growing-garlic/ )

By the way – garlic actually helps against mosquitos – they bite less and if though, the itching is over very fast most of the time (with me, if I even feel them, maybe a half hour max.)


Further on, they can be driven away by Christian symbols (probably because of place and time of the original stories) if used in faith and they can be killed by staking into the heart. … I’m sure, I’m not telling you anything new …. They live hidden over centuries or even millennia. In the modern, more “romanticized” stories they try to feed of small animals or get blood from hospital blood-banks or where ever and with special rings or though, they’re able to walk in the sunlight….



From Wikipedia:

Vampire fiction is rooted in the "vampire craze" of the 1720s and 1730s, which culminated in the somewhat bizarre official exhumations of suspected vampires Petar Blagojevich and Arnold Paole in Serbia under the Habsburg Monarchy. One of the first works of art to touch upon the subject is the short German poem The Vampire (1748) by Heinrich August Ossenfelder, where the theme already has strong erotic overtones

In a passage in his epic poem The Giaour (1813), Lord Byron alludes to the traditional folkloric conception of the vampire as a being damned to suck the blood and destroy the life of its nearest relations:

But first, on earth as vampire sent, Thy corpse shall from its tomb be rent: Then ghostly haunt thy native place, And suck the blood of all thy race;

There from thy daughter, sister, wife, At midnight drain the stream of life; Yet loathe the banquet which perforce Must feed thy livid living corpse: Thy victims ere they yet expire Shall know thy demon for their sire, As cursing thee, thou cursing them, Thy flowers are withered on the stem.

https://www.history.com/topics/folklore/vampire-history

So, in short, these stories were made up out of fear of the unknown and a “picture” of what happened to people…. Picture-language…. As you can read in the link above, it seems the story-ground was disease. Illnesses have often been associated with the “evil” or even as a “punishment”. Yes, in some ways it is, as everything is cause and effect but it’s for sure no “punishment” in the meaning of an “outside entity” forcing that onto us because we committed something called “sin”….

Some years ago, I’ve heard the term “energy vampires” – people who kind of drain us, maybe not consciously or willingly but they do – we feel empty, tired, exhausted, drained after being with such people. For sure that’s nothing new neither – so maybe some of the old scary stories are talking about this phenomena as well….

For thousands of years, the women have been kind of “demonized” as men couldn’t resist desire, so very practical to blame the women for it… we All know these stories just too well. My point here is, that we understand more and more of the picture lan